Facsimilies, Ltd., was principally founded in 1983 by artist Joan Terrell Smith to reproduce sculptural reliefs of museum pieces, architectural details, metalwork and ancient stone tablets. Molds were hand crafted and various gypsum cement formulations (called "hydrostone" in the trade today) were used to create these historically accurate art objects. Finishes were applied post production.

All are three dimensional and are intended to be wall-mounted. All have depth (not listed below) appropriate to the relative size of the piece (depths range from 1/2 inch to 2 inches plus) and have indentations on the backs to accommodate the use of finish (headless) nails hammered at 45 degree angles into the hanging surface. Picture hooks are not secure enough, nor will they allow the pieces to set flat against the wall or mounting surface.

These wonderful reliefs are intended solely for indoor use. Cleaning is accomplished with a clean, dry paint brush or dry dust cloth. Spills or smudges may be removed with light rubbing with a water dampened cloth. Chemical cleaners should not be used to avoid damage to the finish. Though breakable, these reliefs mount securely to walls. Their relative fragility requires special care in shipping. Each piece will be professionally handled and shipped insured. Please see shipping policies for more info.

Circles on the Square is proud to offer our inventory of these beautiful sculptural reliefs from this once prosperous, now defunct, group of artisan craftsmen. Owning one of these delightful objects is like owning a piece of history. Quantities very limited.




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Justice Mirror
Adapted from a rare Victorian silver picture frame - probably European in origin. Justice - who surmounts the frame - is chief of the four cardinal virtues - the others being Prudence - Fortitude - and Temperance. Her sword represents her power - the scales ( a refinement dating from the Roman era) her impartiality. The dove at the bottom represents the relationship defined in Psalm 85 ( verse 10) "Justice and Peace join hands." The figure of Justice is commonly seen on buildings wherever the law is administered. 8 inches high. European Ca. 1880.
Price: 45.00
Out of Stock
TRIPLE CROSS (N29)
A traditional piece from Byzantine and Russian sources. The Church Slavonic script reads from the top and left to right as follows: "King of Glory," "INRI (Jesus Nazarene King of Judea)," "Son of God," "Jesus Christ," "Your Cross we adore O Lord/Master." At his feet are the words "To Conquer." At his left side are a Holy Apostle and a converted Roman soldier. At his right side are St. Mary and St. Martha. Below his feet is the skull of Adam in keeping with the legend that the Cross would be erected over Adam's grave. At the very top are the figures of God and the Archangels Gabriel and Michael. This piece was reproduced from the original, which was cast in gold. Byzantine. 8 1/2" high x 5" wide.
Price: 45.00
IRISH CROSS (N41)
During the 8th century, most of the large Irish monasteries began decorating their courtyards with enormous stone crosses carved on four sides and densely laden with Biblical scenes. Thirty or more of these crosses survive. Recarved in miniature from photographs. Irish circa 8th century 9 7/8 inches high x 6 1/8 wide
Price: 45.00



Small Edwardian Mirror
Reproduced from a gutta-percha picture frame of neo-classical design - this piece probably dates from the late Victorian or Edwardian period. 5" high. American ca. 1900
Price: 35.00
Round Cherub Mirror
Reproduced from an advertising premium distributed by the American Mail Chute Company to promote the delicate bronzework incorporated into its products. The cherub and dolfin tracery utilizes classical motifs popular at the turn of the century. Many fine examples of this company's work are still in use today. Antique gold finish. 5 1/4" diameter. American Late 19th century
Price: 35.00
Garland Mirror
This mirror - with its garlands of flowers - cherubic supporters and extravagant foliage - suggests a baroque or rococo origin. The piece is - however - reproduced from a copper picture frame dating from about the beginning of the 20th century. 8 1/4" high. American Ca. 1900
Price: 45.00



Cameo Mirror
This mirror - with its finely detailed grape clusters - festoons of flowers and elegant cameo - was reproduced from a gutta-percha picture frame. Classical details are combined with Victorian exuberance to highlight the central beaded mirror border. 10" high. American Late 19th century
Price: 50.00
Victory Tablet of King Nar-Mer
The original from which this piece was re-interpreted - an ancient Egyptian relief of the beginning of the Early Dynastic Period (ca. 3200 BC) - was found at Hierakonopolis - near Idfu - and is now in the Cairo Museum. At the top are heads of the goddess Hathor with ears and horns of a cow - as well as the king's name - expressed by hieroglyphs for sheath-fish and chisel. Nar-Mer - wearing the crown of upper Egypt - strikes down an enemy held by the hair. Behind him is the sandal-bearer with his master's salve box and sandals. Above the kneeling victim - the king - in the shape of a falcon god - is holding by the lip the head of a captive rising out of the hieroglyph meaning "land." The six plants nearby symbolize six thousand captives. Below are two naked fallen enemies with the names of districts or tribes. 15 3/4" high. ca. 3200 BC
Price: 65.00
Celtic Tree of Life Mirror
The design from which this mirror is taken comes from a "Potted Tree of Life" border in the Book of Kells. Called - in the Annals of Ulster - "the great Gospel of Columkille - the chief relic of the western world," the Book of kells is unrivaled for its wealth of decorartive detail. While its exact origin is unknown - it may have been produced in Iona in the late 8th century. The tree of life symbol is found in the art of many ethnic groups and is common on the great Pictish stones of East Scotland. 10 1/4" high. Celtic ca. late 8th century
Price: 75.00



Bulls Fording the Nile
This rural scene from the Mastaba of the Vizir Kagemni - part of the enormous tomb complex at Saqqara - depicts oxen crossing the Nile while in the water below them a hippo walks surrounded by a variety of fish. The delicasy of the carving and sensitivity of observation makes this a model of the genre.The naturalism of the rendering contrasts with the typically Egyptian conceit of the disappearance of the oxens' legs under the water. Recarved from photographs. 14" wide. 5th Dynasty ( ca. 2500 BC )
Price: 59.00
Altarfront of the Lombard King - Ratchis
During the Visigothic period in Spain - moveable decorative elements such as chancels - pillars and altar supports vied with rich architectural elements such as friezes - cornices - imposts and capitals. This re-carved example clearly belongs half-waybetween the great decorations of Late Antiquity and those which were to culminate in Romanesque art in subsequent centuries. Sculpture of this period was characterized by a constricting rigidity of the frame - the flattened form of relief - the exaggerated proportions of the figures and the simultaneous frontal and profiled representation of the bodies. The original is located in the Church of San Martino - Cividale del Friuli - Venetia. 14 1/4" wide. Italian ca. 825 - 850
Price: 65.00
Out of Stock
Grapevine Mirror
This vigorously carved frame - reproduced from a wooden original - symmetrically arrays a beautifully detailed grapevine around its border. It is reminescent of the work of William Morris - one of the founders of the Arts and Crafts movement in 19th century England - which borrowed and reinterpreted medieval and renaissance forms. The outer border of the frame is established by the botanical motif - overlaying a traditional picture frame created from multiple tiers of moldings. The latter determines both the underlying contour of the frame and its inner border. 10 1/2" high. English 19th century
Price: 75.00



Cameo and Cherub Mirror
This mirror - with its many finely detailed architectural elements and cornucopia-bearing cherubs waiting in attendance upon the serene figure of a woman presented in elegant cameo - was reproduced from a gutta-percha picture frame. The rounded-corner shape of the cross-hatch bordered mirror is unusual in this genre. 10 3/4 " high. English Late 19th century
Price: 75.00
Calmady Children
The painting of Emily and Laura Calmady by noted British portraitist Sir thomas Lawrence (1769-1830) on which this bas relief was based dates from 1824. The original painting hangs in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. 7 1/4" diameter. 19th century
Price: 45.00
Art Nouveau Angel Mirror
Reproduced from a bronze picture frame of European - probably French - origin dating from the end of the 19th century - this mirror comes from a period of transition from neo-classical to art nouveau in decorative arts - the relative severity of the architectural elements contrasting happily with the fluidity of the angels' robes. 8 1/2" high. French late 19th century
Price: 75.00



Empire Mirror with Mermaids
This mirror was adapted from an Empire period bronze thermometer - almost certainly of French origin. The design elements relate to sun and water - and - thus - to temperature. Mermaids were the descendants of Neptune and Amphitrite - a sea nymph: their use in neo-classical ornamentation is widespread. The sun face at the top is reminiscent of the emblem of Louis XIV of France - the "Sun King," who embellished his "converted hunting lodge," Versailles - with this image. 7 1/4" high. French ca. 1820
Price: 50.00
Angel with Flowers
A fine example of the work of Joseph Lamson and of the early use of a winged head effigy replacing the traditional death's head. Mary Cutler - for whom this stone was cut - was the daughter of Anna Cutler - about whom Cotton mather wrote in the "Magnalia" that she died in Boston the same day and hour that her son - Robert - died in Barbados. 14" long. Charlestown - Massachusetts 1703
Price: 45.00
John Jack
This stone was set in 1830 to replace the damaged original - composed in Latin and erected by the Tory sympathizer - Daniel Bliss. The stone expresses the irony of the struggle for freedom from England by a Colony that recognized the right of one man to enslave another. At his death a respected landowner of Concord - John Jack has been immortalized by these now-famous lines. 6 1/4" high. Concord - Massachusetts 1773
Price: 25.00
Out of Stock



Lydia Dyar
It is unusual to find a woman's stone that comments on her own actions rather than on her role as adjunct to or "relict" of her husband. The historically-significant epitaph came into use at a time when the artistic side of stonecutting had become static and formula-ridden. Even the summation couplet is one of a handful used repeatedly by stonecutters of the period. 6 1/4" high. Billerica - Massachusetts 1776
Price: 25.00
Out of Stock
Scarab Mirror
Reproduced from a bronze original - this piece is representative of the Egyptian revival in decorative arts of the Empire period in France. Napoleon's invasion of Egypt in 1798 - led to an awareness of the ancient art of that land - the motifs of which were incorporated into the furniture and decorative arts of France. 6 3/4 " dia. French Ca. mid- 19th century
Price: 45.00
Large Dragon Mirror
The Dragon exists in the mythology of every people. In the Chinese culture - however - it was revered as King (Lung Wang) or god. Dragons were reputed to carry in their throats a pearl of great worth and to live in magnificent underwater palaces from which they could ionfluence the climate for good or evil. They were believed capable of changing their form at will. In ancient China - intimate knowledge of Dragons was considered indispensible to survival. 10" high. Chinese ca. early 20th century
Price: 85.00



Angel
This fine stone was one of many cut by Nathaniel and Caleb Lamson - using a distinctive striped slate - the banding of which can be seen running vertically through this reproduction. The elegance and charm of the angel - in imitation of contemporary European models - and the use of the fig motif - denoting prosperity - are typical of their work. 14" long. Cambridge - Massachusetts 1752
Price: 50.00
Father Time
This stone is of particular interest as it appears to have been borrowed for John Tawley and his brother Thomas from its original owner. By comparing it to a remarkably similar one in Salem - dated 1698 - and observing that the inscription on this stone seems to be sunken and perhaps recut - noted authority Harriet Forbes concluded that the stone was appropriated for the Tawleys. It is the work of the great "Stonecutter of Boston," and depicts Father Time with his scythe and hourglass symbolizing the flight of time. 15" high. Marblehead - Massachusetts c. 1698, recut 1746
Price: 49.00
The Dancers
A Victorian Box by Facsimilies Ltd. The top of this box is a cast reproduction of a union case that was made between about 1853 and 1870. The development of the first thermoplastics from heated compounds including sawdust and shellac led to a brief boom in union cases for the display of daguerreotypes. When less fragile photographic forms appeared in the 1860's, the demand for Union Cases faded away as rapidly as it had been created. The box top is cast in Hydrocal (a strong gypsum cement) using a rubber mold made from the original case. Finished with a translucent wax overcoat, formulated to give the box top the appearance of ivory. The box is hand-crafted from various hardwoods. Only one in stock! 5 inches long by 4 1/16 wide and 2 3/8 inches high.
Price: 90.00
Out of Stock



Two Sisters
Another Victorian union case reproduction by Facsimilies Ltd. Same description as "The Dancers" Only one in stock! 3 1/2 inches long by 3 7/8 wide and 1 5/8 inches high.
Price: 75.00
Out of Stock
Fruit
Another Victorian union case reproduction by Facsimilies Ltd. Same description as "The Dancers" Only one in stock! 2 1/8 inches long by 1 7/8 wide and 1 3/8 inches high. Note: the underside of this box top has a slight chip, seen only when the top is removed and inverted. Sold as is.
Price: 35.00
Dragon
This relief has been reproduced from an elaborate carving in the library of Chateau Sur-Mer, the first of the great villas on Bellevue Avenue. Initial construction of this home, built for William Shepard Wetmore, who made his fortune in the China trade, was completed in 1871. The carving forms part of the library's Circassian walnut wall paneling carved by Luigi Frullini (1839-1897) in Florence for the 1876 redecoration of the Wetmore "Castle on the Sea". Italian 1876 - 12 1/4 inches high X 10 wide X 1 inch deep
Price: 95.00



Angel with Cymbals
This angel is one of a set of eight that is found on the fifteen-foot high fron in the center of the Baptistry of the Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine. The angels are carved into the sides of an octagonal pinnacled shaft that rises from the center of the front bowl. Five of the angels are playing musical instruments; one is singing; another is carrying a censer; the eighth is praying. The Baptistry was designed by Cram & Ferguson. Its architectural style is 14th century Gothic, showing both French and Spanish influence in its detail. Beige Marble. American 20th Century. 13 x 3 x 2 inches
Price: 49.00
Out of Stock
Angel with Lyre
This angel is one of a set of eight that is found on the fifteen-foot high fron in the center of the Baptistry of the Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine. The angels are carved into the sides of an octagonal pinnacled shaft that rises from the center of the front bowl. Five of the angels are playing musical instruments; one is singing; another is carrying a censer; the eighth is praying. The Baptistry was designed by Cram & Ferguson. Its architectural style is 14th century Gothic, showing both French and Spanish influence in its detail. Beige Marble. American, 20th Century. 13.25 x 2.5 x 2 inches
Price: 49.00
Out of Stock
Angel with Censer
This angel is one of a set of eight that is found on the fifteen-foot high fron in the center of the Baptistry of the Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine. The angels are carved into the sides of an octagonal pinnacled shaft that rises from the center of the front bowl. Five of the angels are playing musical instruments; one is singing; another is carrying a censer; the eighth is praying. The Baptistry was designed by Cram & Ferguson. Its architectural style is 14th century Gothic, showing both French and Spanish influence in its detail. Beige Marble. American, 20th Century. 13.5 x 3 x 2 inches
Price: 49.00
Out of Stock



Tortoise
This tortoise is suggested by a Mimbres Indian (Arizona, New Mexico) pottery design. The original is always broken when the owner dies to let its Spirit go with him to the Spirit land. Mimbres Indian. Slate. 1st Century. 7.5 x 4.87 x .5 inches
Price: 25.00
Satyr Mask
This relief mask of a satyr, a woodland creature from Greek mythology with a fondness for unrestrained revelry, has been reproduced from the base of a bronze standard lamp in the Great Hall of The Breakers, Newport, Rhode Island. Executed in 1895 for Cornelius Vanderbilt, II, by the New York firm of Archer, Pancoast & Company, the lamp was itself copied from an Italian Baroque torchere. The expressive satyr mask, flanked with grape clusters, is a fine example of late 19th century metalwork. Yellow Bronze. American, 1895. 12.25 x 10 x 5 inches
Price: 75.00
Passion figure with Star
Five Passion figures adorn the fifteen-foot high front of the Baptistry of the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine in New York City. Carved into the sides of a central pinnacled shaft, the figures carry symbols of joyful and sorrowful mysteries. The shell symbolizes the Baptism, the purification of Christ by immersion. The star symbolizes the Nativity. The dove represents the Pentecost. The lily became the dominant symbol of the Virgin in medieval art. The Chalice symbolizes Christ's Last Supper, the night before his crucifixion. Beige Marble. American, 20th century (1928). 10.5 x 3.25 x 2 inches
Price: 45.00



Passion Figure with Lily
Five Passion figures adorn the fifteen-foot high front of the Baptistry of the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine in New York City. Carved into the sides of a central pinnacled shaft, the figures carry symbols of joyful and sorrowful mysteries. The shell symbolizes the Baptism, the purification of Christ by immersion. The star symbolizes the Nativity. The dove represents the Pentecost. The lily became the dominant symbol of the Virgin in medieval art. The Chalice symbolizes Christ’s Last Supper, the night before his crucifixion. Beige Marble. American, 20th century (1928). 10 x 3 x 2 inches
Price: 45.00
Miserigoerge
This fanciful design is based on the sculpted undersides of mainly 14th-century choir stalls known as misericords. From the Latin word Miserere or pity, these hinged seats were designed to provide momentary comfort for aging monks during the long services which were the norm in medieval churches. The themes of these intricate carvings were frequently secular, and many were bawdy. Cathedral Stone. English, 14th century. 2.06 x 3.25 x 3 inches
Price: 28.00
Magdalen College Gargoyle (Large)
The term gargoyle, which derives from the Old French word for windpipe, originally meant a grotesquely carved roof gutter water spout used in Gothic architecture. Today the term refers to any grotesque figure resembling a gargoyle. This delightful recarved example, who may be screaming, yawning, or even singing, comes from Magdalen College Chapel, Oxford University. The chapel dates from the founding of the college in 1458 by William of Waynflete, Bishop of Winchester and Chancellor of England. Cathedral Stone. English, 15th century.
Price: 59.00



Eyes of Horus
The Udjat is the scared eye of Horus, falcon god of Egypt. Egyptian mythology states that Horus lost his left eye in his war with Seth to avenge his father's death. Seth tore the eye into pieces. The eyepieces were discovered by Thoth (the god of wisdom and magic) who was able to reassemble them into a full moon. Thoth returned the eye to Horus who, in turn, gave the eye to his murdered father Osiris, thereby bringing him back to life. The symbol of the udjat was believed to ward off sickness and bad luck and be capable of bringing the dead to life. Slate. Egyptian. 6.25 x 3.75 x .5 inches
Price: 25.00
Ship with Angel
This stone located In the beautiful Hill Burying Ground (overlooking the ocean) in Plymouth, Massachusetts, marks the grave of a young sea captain, Chandler Holmes. The unusually interesting 19th century stone shows the captain's foundering ship, the ship of his life, and the angel of the Resurrection blowing the last trumpet above it. Stone. American 19th century. 6.25 x 11 x 1 inch
Price: 49.00
Misery's Love O Come to Me
This bronze relief comes from one of a series of panels decorating a small letter cabinet, believed to be of turn-of-the-century British origin. The art nouveau panel contains a quotation from Act III, Scene iv of King John, one of Shakespeare's lesser known history plays. This invocation of death by Constance, Duchess of Bretagne, results from the loss of Arthur, her son and nephew of King John. Pewter. British, 19th century. 12.81 x 3.38 x .5 inches
Price: 45.00



Parian Shelf
This bracket was reproduced from a 19th century Parianware piece, probably of French origin. Parianware was a from of hard paste porcelain produced in Europe and America with the intent of imitating the appearance of the fine, white marble found in Paris, Greece. Many objects, some utilitarian, others purely decorative, were made from this material. This piece, though classical in form and in the modeling of the face, incorporates contemporary costume with shell and horn-of-plenty motifs. White Marble. French, 19th century. 5 x 4 x 4.5 inches
Price: 38.00
Gryphon
This sculpture derives from a 13th century French cathedral relief. The gryphon, a fabulous monster with the head, wings and claws of an eagle and the body of a lion, had its origins in the ancient east where it was said to guard the gold of India. In Christian iconography, it symbolizes the dual nature of Jesus (the divine represented by the bird and the human, by the animal) and is common in Gothic church sculpture. Cathedral Stone. French, 13th century. 6.25 x 4.25 x .75 inches
Price: 38.00
Water Goddess
A monolith of Teotihuacan origin, Chalchiuittlique (kal-koo-it-li-kay) stands about ten feet high in the Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City. Called 'Our Lady of the Jade Skirt' by the natives, she is the water goddess of the ancients. Slate. Mayan. 7.13 x 4 x 1 inch
Price: 39.00



Zephyr Plaque
Aeolus, The lord of the winds, with his whiskers, hair, and beard billowing around him, gently blows bad spirits away. In the works of Homer, Aeolus controlled the winds and ruled the floating island of Aeolia. Specifically in the Odyssey, he gave Odysseus a favorable wind and a bag in which the unfavorable winds were confined. zephyr is the personification of the West Wind or very simply, a gentle breeze. This image is derived from a silver paperweight. Stone. European, 19th century. 7.75 x 7 x 2 inches
Price: 65.00
Hand to God
This relief is from a marble gravestone located in Forest Hills cemetery, Forest Hills, Massachusetts. Its stylized hand pointing upward was often used to symbolize the passage of a person's soul to heaven. White marble. American, 19th century (1846). 10.63 x 8 x 1.25 inches
Price: 59.00
Buddha
Inspired by a Tibetan Buddhist repousse`, here Buddha overcomes the temptations of Mara (the personification of evil) to attain enlightenment. The smaller meditating figures are Bottisatvas, disciples of Buddha, who have remained mortal. The bird-like figure swallowing serpents at the top is Garuda, the devourer of the ego. Ivory. Tibetan. 11.5 x 13.5 x .5 inches
Price: 75.00



Mandala
This mandala, from a Tibetan copper repoussee piece is an excellent example of tantric art in Tibet. In the central ring of the wheel are the eight trigrams that comprise the 64 hexagrams of the I Chings. In the outer ring, the animals symbolize the twelve years of the Chinese calendar. At the top left, the mandala is being devoured by Vajrapani, Guardian of the secret tantric law. At the top center is Manjusri, the Lord of Wisdom, cutting through ignorance with his sword. On the right is Chenrezi, the Lord of compassion. Holding the Mandala may be yama, the god of the Underworld. Ivory. Tibetan. 11.88 x 10.63 x.75 inches
Price: 75.00
Wheel of Life
A Tibetan Buddhist wheel of life is held like a mirror by Yama, the Lord of Death, and represents the stages of the soul's journey. The animals pursuing each other in the inner circle symbolize the ego drives that cause suffering: the pig / ignorance, the rooster / passion and greed and the snake / hatred. Bronze. Tibetan. 14 x 11 x .5 inches
Price: 75.00
Victory Angel
This exquisite head comes from the winged figure supporting the lectern of the Arts and Crafts movement Church of the Holy trinity, Sloane Square, London. The angel holds aloft a laurel wreath, symbol of victory in Greco-Roman paganism. The winged Nike, who crowned the victor in contests of arms, athletics, or poetry was the prototype of the depiction of the angel in Christian art. The purity of form and feature typical of the pre-Raphaelite depiction of women is captured in this elegant sculpture. White Marble. English, 19th century. 9.75 x 4.25 x 6.5 inches
Price: 65.00



Holy Trinity Angel with Cymbals
For centuries, religious artists arranged angels in hierarchical ranks, attending to duties assigned to them by the artists - taking part in Annunciation scenes, Coronations of the Virgin, and so forth. Even open mouthed, their function as holy choristers was not readily apparent. By the 15th century, a remedy had been found. Angel choirs were now provided with a host of musical instruments: fiddles, flutes, cymbals, harps and psalteries - to lend visual weight to their music making abilities. This celestial musician is one of four carved by Victorian sculptor, F.W. Pomeroy, for the choir stalls of Holy Trinity Church in Sloane Square, London. English, 20th century. 7 inches round x 1 inch deep
Price: 45.00
Holy Trinity Angel with Lyre
For centuries, religious artists arranged angels in hierarchical ranks, attending to duties assigned to them by the artists - taking part in Annunciation scenes, Coronations of the Virgin, and so forth. Even open mouthed, their function as holy choristers was not readily apparent. By the 15th century, a remedy had been found. Angel choirs were now provided with a host of musical instruments: fiddles, flutes, cymbals, harps and psalteries - to lend visual weight to their music making abilities. This celestial musician is one of four carved by Victorian sculptor, F.W. Pomeroy, for the choir stalls of Holy Trinity Church in Sloane Square, London. English, 20th century. 7 inches round x 1 inch deep
Price: 45.00
 

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Credits: Dynamic Drive CSS Library